Posts Tagged fruity

A Legend in its Own Right

 The legend of Nosferatu began with a German silent horror film in 1922. It was basically an unauthorized adaptation of Bram Stoker’s, Dracula.  Legal battles between the filmmaker and the heirs of the author of Dracula, Bram Stoker, resulted in most copies of the film being destroyed for copyright infringement. It seems when thing like this happen, legends are born.

I had actually heard about a beer sharing the same name of the film as being something of a legend, so I could not wait to try it out. Accordingly, the next beer I found myself grabbing from the fridge of treasures from Great Lakes was Nosferatu IRA (8% abv).

Great Lakes NosferatuIt poured opaque, rich amber, with loose white head on top. The aromas were fruity and perfumy. It was a little sugary, accompanied by some dark fruits. It tasted rich and slightly tart, with sweetness and only a touch of malt. The middle was medium-bodied and lightly-carbonated, with a little hoppy bitterness. The finish was fruity and smooth.

I’m not sure about the legend, but I will take this beer whenever I can find it.

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Abbey Road South

Abbey pano

No, not the Beatles album from 1969… This was a craft beer purveyor in the South Park neighborhood of San Diego that billed itself as a pub. I don’t know if it necessarily met my personal definition of “pub,” but it was a cool place. Laid out in an L-shape, this relatively small bar/eatery sat at the intersection of the two main streets in town. It was fronted with large windows and roll-up doors, with tap handles hanging from the ceiling above. A small three-sided bar was located toward the back, with lots of mostly low-top tables in between the bar and the front door. Three TVs and a large projection screen adorned the little wall space that remained. Off to the left was a pool table and to the right outside was a small, narrow patio that faced the street away from the front door.

Craftsman saisonI had one beer while I was here: Craftsman Fireworks Saison (6.5% abv). This beer poured oddly dark, as most other saisons I had ever had were very light in color, with light white head. Aromas were malty sweet with a slight sourness and some fruitiness that I could not identify. It tasted malty sweet at first, then some fruit that tasted like melons and raisins came through in the middle. Light body and lightly carbonated, it finished somewhat sweet, with a touch of tartness to keep things interesting.

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Great Hops of Fire!

Deschutes Cinder Cone Red“Goodness, gracious, great [hops] of fire!” …ok, not really, but it sounded clever (enough). I would have thought with a name like Cinder Cone that this was a seasonal, but apparently they brew it year round. I had never seen this one from Deschutes before so I was kind of excited to try it.

It poured a deep orange-red with sudsy medium white head that streaked down the glass a little. The aromas included a slight fruity sweetness and a touch of sourness, but mostly hops. This gave me pause, as it didn’t present itself as an imperial red ale, but just as a regular red. My confusion lasted but a second, though and I pressed on. The first taste I got was bitterness right out the gate. It did have a smooth mouthfeel, with light carbonation and a bit of fruitiness.Cinder Cone top Toward the end, it presented the maltiness I had been missing the whole way through, but finished fruity and hoppy.

I was disappointed by the emphasis on the hops in this one, as I expected a bit more malty warmth from a beer with such a fiery name. Alas, too many hops for me, but still passable:

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Arts and Craft Beer

IMG_1930 Sort of like a Wheel of Fortune puzzle category, no?

Even though it’s only available between January and April, I was able to get my hands on this lovely concoction. Another from Ninkasi, Mosaic is an ale made with a single type of hop. In this case, that happens to be the mosaic hop. Primarily used for aroma, this little goody is said to impart “a complex array of tropical fruit, citrus, berry, herbal, earthy and pine characteristics.” (www.hopunion.com, 2014). But we’ll get to the smelly bit later. First, the pour.

As you can see, it pours the deep clear golden color of a pale ale, with bright white, loose foam at the top. Not much activity in the way of carbonation in this one. The aromas coming from this beer were a bit fruity and there was a hint of pine. I also detected a bit of fresh-cut grass in there, as well. I entered into the tasting with a bit of trepidation. Anyone who has read this blog knows hops and I are rarely on good terms. I must say, though, that I am becoming better able to stomach the good old fashioned IPA a bit more than I used to, so the tide may be turning for me.

IMG_1931On the first sip, I caught the fruit flavors coming through– mostly grapefruit, some orange-like flavors, and maybe a little lemon for good measure. Then came the herbal pine taste. This was not unpleasant and a little surprising. It is always good to keep things interesting. The smooth maltiness this beer offers helped tone that down to a pleasant mildness that followed. That same pine taste did creep through in the aftertaste, though it faded a bit to a pretty mellow finish.

I was pleasantly surprised by this and was left with an overall warm feeling from this beer.

I would rate this beer:

                       4

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